Radiometric dating of rocks

These were once molten lavas that were successively erupted onto the earth’s surface through volcanic vents and fissures and flowed over already deposited layers of siltstones.They quickly hardened into the dense, black rock called basalt .

They quickly hardened to the dense, black rock called basalt Certain “parent” elements such as potassium, rubidium, uranium and samarium are radioactive and change by decay over time (very slowly according to today’s laboratory measurements) into “daughter” elements argon, strontium, lead and neodymium, respectively.Over time, radioactive isotopes change into stable isotopes by a process known as radioactive decay.Some radioactive parent isotopes decay almost instantaneously into their stable daughter isotopes; others take billions of years. Wiens has a Ph D in Physics, with a minor in Geology.His Ph D thesis was on isotope ratios in meteorites, including surface exposure dating.The rates of decay of various radioactive isotopes have been accurately measured in the laboratory and have been shown to be constant, even in extreme temperatures and pressures.

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